Anchoring and Docking
- Marine/Boat Anchors, Fenders, mooring Buoys, Anchor Parts and Accessories for sale


Bruce & Claw Anchor type

Danforth type

Mushroom Anchors

Grapnel Anchor type

CQR (Delta style) Anchor

Hans ("STEALTH"Design) Anchors

Hans Anchor

Hans (STEALTH - Design) Anchor

Lightweight, available in a wide range from 2.5 - 18 Kg, (5.5 - 40 Lb).

Designed to be used for all boats,in various situations!

photos: www.hansanchor.com

contacts:

HANS Anchor, Inc.

2727 6th Ave. S., St. Petersburg

FL 33712, USA

Tel: 727-688-5944

Tollfree: 727-565-1355

Europe: +46-31-360-8811

hans@hansanchor.com

web: http://www.hansanchor.com

The Hans C-Anchor is a revolutionary concept in ground anchors combining many of the features of the plow. SSPF. and Northill anchor designs. The arrow-shaped flukes and crown make up a diamond-shaped body attached to the stock. The fluke angle is adjustable according to seabed composition. It is manufactured of hot-galvanized steel. Courtesy: Hans C-Anchor, Inc.

In the sections that follow, "Jon Kaplan" give a more detailed presentation of Anchor

We call it Napoleon's Hat. It's shaped sort of like that, but I wouldn't want to wear it on my head. It's somewhere between a plow and an "inverted Danforth" both in shape and weight, and It really works. It's the "Hans-C Anchor" and we gave one a workout in Anchor Bay. (How appropriate!)

Cyclops, my 1968 Tartan 27 sailboat, served as test boat, and the extra weedy conditions of 1994 provided the challenge. Rigged with only six feet of quarter-inch chain for chafe protection and half-inch nylon three-strand line, my partner Kay Champion and I substituted Hans for our usual thirteen-pound Danforth (old style) on a typical weekend jaunt.

Anchor bay affords us different sections with different bottom composites sowe got to test the anchor in sand, clay, muck, gravel and various amounts of weeds. In each test situation we followed the same procedure which we felt was typical for the average cruiser, power or sail: I lowered the anchor by hand from the bow as Cyclops drifted slowly downwind. I snubbed the rode at about 5-to-1 scope, then let the line out to about 7-to-1. This was in six feet of water, ten feet from deck to bottom, so 5-to-1 was 50 feet, 7-to-1 was 70 feet, plus the six feet of chain. I then put the engine in reverse and we measured the holding power.

In all but two bottom types, the same bottoms where the Danforth usually takes a few feet to bury before grabbing for good, the Hans was instantly locked to the bottom. Even at full throttle, THE ANCHOR DID NOT MOVE AT ALL!

This anchor literally dug in and held in weeds, mud, clay, gravel,you name it, like I said... in all but two of our bottom types it showed superior holding power in a light, compact package.

Driving over the anchor to simulate a wind shift didn't faze Napoleon's Hat either. It simply stayed put, resetting right where it was without snagging its own rode. The real surprise of the test came when we wanted to pull the anchor up. After it had set so firmly, I expectedsome work to haul it back, but every time, as soon as the rode came to vertical it was out. No grunting required I could hardly tell when it broke loose. Just the slightest tug and up it came, clean as a whistle from most bottom types. There is an eye for a retrieving line, but I doubt if you'll need it often. In mud there was a small knob of muck on the beak and from the heavy weeds, salad for 20. So what were the two bottoms where this anchor failed? Not a fair test, really, but there is a small section of our bay where the "super weeds" grow. In the better part of two decades of anchoring here, none of us yet have found anything that can penetrate this sod like weed bed. The sensible ones gave up years ago but every season, we watch the new comers drift across that section of water as if unattached and then bang, they grip and hold when they cross over the edge. The

Hans

anchor

had gripped so well in everything else we had tried, we figured, why not? It seemed to do the best job of anything I've ever tried there and for a while I actually thought we had beat the bottom here. But we slowly worked our way (over lynch) across the patch and then bit in like everyone else. The other test location where we had trouble was also a lost cause. There is a section near the end of Swan Creek where the bottom has the same consistency as tooth paste. Sailors never worry about running aground here because if you just crank up your engine a little, you'll wallow right through no matter what your draft. Folks with outdrive units just blast the bottom away usually without even realizing it.

When we pulled the Hans C Anchor up from attempting to anchor here, the anchor, the chain, and several feet of rode were painted with a light gray muck that easily hosed off. No one anchors here, this is why.

The first rule of anchoring is to select a good anchor. The Hans C Anchor is an excellent product. The next rule is to select a suitable place to anchor. The Hans anchor did well in even some less than suitable places, but in its defense, no one anchors in the two places where it failed. Boaters learn lessons like that just as cowboys learn not to tie their horses up to grape vines, and pirates learn not to bury their treasure next to a cow (the cow will move later). Overall the Hans-C Anchor gave a sterling performance. Well, O.K., galvanized. The Hans-C offers excellent holding power in a smaller, lighter package when compared to a more traditional anchor, and it didn't need a lot of heavy chain. But its best attribute as far as I'm concerned, is its superior retrievability because bringingyouranchor back up to the deckis the worstpart of any anchoring experience. Any thing that i mproves that aspect alone is a real winner in my book. One minor difficulty might be stowing a steel Napoleon's Hat. It doesn't fit well on smaller bow rollers, and it doesn't lie flat, so you'll need to plan some accom- modation for it. I hope the makers will give this some thought, and offer their own solution. Until then, get your own and keep it in a locker or stow it on a rail.

C-Anchor publications

Learn more about Characteristics and "perfect" C-Anchor - ideal for all marine applications

Anchors


Hold that line

Published In "Housboat" January&February 1994

Lest we forget, an anchor is a specially shaped metal device designed to dig efficiently into Davy Jones' locker and hold your houseboat in place despite winds and currents.

There are many *(see below)types of anchors used on houseboats. The old- fashioned, or yachtsman's type of anchor of years past has given way to modern patented types. Today's anchors have become so advanced in fact, that they can be used in almost all marine applications. Modern anchors are fast-setting, easy to release, have exceptional lightweight to holding power, and are even equipped with clever non-fouling features.

It began in 1986 when Swedish engineer and yachtsman, Hans Claesson began a research and development program to design the "perfect" anchor. Testing with other premium anchors in countless combinations of water, weather and seabed conditions produced the Hans C-Anchor. Dozens of Hans C-Anchors were used to hold containment booms in place when other anchors failed during the Tampa Bay. FL. oil spill. Today, the St. Petersburg. FL, based anchor manufacturer offers a complete size range of anchors from 5.5 to 77 pounds for boats 14 to 100

feet and priced from $59 to $650.

Characteristic

of the Hans C-Anchor is its light weight to holding power, fast-setting, non-fouling and easy release. 360-degree veering ability to compensate wind and current changes, a fluke-shank angle adjustment option and its consistently strong holding power in all types of seabeds.

Made in the United States

under stringent quality controls, the Hans C-Anchor is ideal for all marine applications and provides exceptional value to boaters. To back their anchor line. Hans C-Anchor Inc. offers a money back guarantee if you're not satisfied.

Types of anchors:

(ADMIRALTY) - FISHERMAN'S ANCHOR. THIS IS THE TRADITIONAL ANCHOR IT HAS GOOD HOLDING POWER. PARTICULARLY WHEN USED IN W BED OR ROCK CREVK ES. ITS DRAW BACKS ARE THAT IT IS RATHER AW KW ARD TO HANDLE. AND IF IT BECOMES UNSTOCKED, IT WILL COME OIT OF THE GROUND AND BE USELESS. THE STOCK MAY BE HELD IN POSITION BY A SIMPLE WEDGE. WHICH IS DANGEROUS AS THE WEDGE SLIPS OUT EASILY. A COTTER (DOUBLE-NOTCHED WEDGE) IS BETTER.

CQR type Anchor - COASTAL QllCK RELEASE ANCHOR. THE FIRST MODERN SCIENTIFICALLY DESIGNED STOCKLESS ANCHOR. ITS SHAPE MAKES IT PENETRATE PROGRESSIVELY. AND IT MAY BURY ITSELF IN REACHING GROUND COMPACT ENOUGH TO HOLD IT. IT IS INTENDED TO LIE ON ITS SIDE WHEN FIRST LAID. SO THERE IS NO NEED TO INSERT IT INTO THE GROUND UPRIGHT. AS YOU MAY FEEL INCLINED TO DO IN SHALLOW WATER. THE PRECISE SHAPE OF THE FLUKE IS IMPORTANT. AND IMITATIONS EXIST WHICH WILL NOT ENTER THE GROUND, OR TWIST OUT IN CERTAIN CONDITIONS.

BRUCE TYPE ANCHOR. THIS WAS DESIGNED FOR ANCHORING OIL RIGS. IT IS IN ONE PIECE WITH NO MOVING PARTS. WHICH MAKES IT LESS LIKELY TO GO WRONG. THE THREE WINGS OF ITS FLUKE ARE CURVED TO M AKE IT LIKELY TO ENTER THE GROUND HOWEVER IT FALLS.

DANFORTH ANCHOR. THIS IS AN OLDER DESIGN THAN EITHER THE CQR OR THE BRUCE. IT WORKS SATISFACTORILY IN MOST TYPES OF GROUND. BIT IT CAN BE AWKWARD TO STOW.

THE DANFORTH UTILITY ANCHOR MADE OF HOT-DIP GALVANIZED CAST STEEL IS A VARIATION ON THE BASIC NORTHILL DESIGN AND IS CONSIDERABLY MORE RUGGED AND HEAVIER. ONLY THE STOCK FOLDS, NOT THE ARMS. NORTHILL INVENTED HIS ANCHOR WHILE IN THE EMPLOY OF NORTHROP CORPORATION. I SUSPECT THAT THE ORIGINAL STAINLESS STEEL NORTHILL ANCHORS WERE MADE BY MANY MANUFACTURERS DURING WORLD WAR II. THEY WENT OUT OF PRODUCTION IN THE LATE 1940S AND THE PATENTS EXPIRED. DANFORTH'S UTILITY VERSION APPEARED IN THE 1960S. THE NORTHILL ANCHOR SUFFERS FROM THE POTENTIAL PROBLEM OF HAVING THE SLACK RODE FOUL THE LAZY ARM STICKING UP FROM THE SEABED. THESE ANCHORS ARE, THEREFORE, NOT GOOD SWINGING ANCHORS AND YOUR BOAT SHOULD NOT BE LEFT UNATTENDED ON THEM.

GRAPNEL (REEF) ANCHOR. ONE OF THE OLDEST PATTERNS, GOING BACK MANY CENTURIES. IT IS LIKE A FOUR-FLUKE FISHERMAN'S W1THOIT THE STOCK. MODERN ONES HAVE FOLDING FLUKES. W HICH SHOULD BE WELL CURVED OR THE ANCHOR WILL TEND TO SKII) OVER THE GROUND AND NOT DIG IN. IT HAS GOOD HOLDING POWER ON ROCKY REEFS. BUT VERY POOR IN SAND OR MUD. THE MOST COMMON ANCHOR FOUND ON SMALL FISHING BOATS.

STOCKLESS (THAMES) ANCHOR. THIS ANCHOR W ORKS ON THE SAME PRINCIPLE AS THE DANFORTH BUT IT HAS A MORE ROUNDED SHAPE. IT IS NORMALLY FOUND ON LARGE MERCHANT VESSELS. IT HAS GOOD HOLDING POWER.

New anchor swings through 360 without losing its grip

By Russ Fee - Field Editor

A Swedish engineer, now living in Si. Petersburg Beach, Fla., has designed an anchor with such unusual features that, he says, it can bend over backwards to engage and hold the bottom. Furthermore, claims Hans Clacsson, his lightweight Hans-C Anchor resists fouling and can easily be released from rocks, mud and man-made obstacles such as trap lines and underwater cobles. Furthermore, when it is embedded in a soft bottom, it will rotate without breaking loose from the bot- tom as the vessel swings with the tide and wind.

The full range of the anchor's performance characteristics has caused it to be labeled "intelligent" in Europe, where it is featured in the OMC Europe Optinuat line of boating accessories. But whatever its IQ may be. it doesn't look much like any other anchor on the market. The head-on view of the anchor is that of an open diamond-shaped frame that is bisected vertically by a sheet-metal wedge.

At the center-front of the wedge is a shank with nn attachment point for the anchor cable. The two rear ends of the ver- tical frame, called the "bills," penetrate the bottom. They are hooded by. and attached to, the fluke plow.

With the anchor on the bottom, a fluke plow and two bills become embedded in the the surface as the anchor is pulled. As pen- etration proceeds, bottom material is added to the top of the anchor, increasing its weight and causing deeper penetration. The anchor often buries itself completely because of the scoop-like design. When the anchor is retrieved, the line and chain exert a near vertical pull on the shank. The shank engages the centerpiece and raises the opposite bill about 90°, and the anchor then slips out of the sea bed. If the anchor snags on a rock, there are no bending forces, and the near-vertical pull of retrieval causes one of the flukes to con- tact the obstruction as the anchor rotates. That fluke then becomes a new pivot point, and the anchor is freed.

Other features include the ability of the anchor's angle of attack to be adjusted for different sea beds, the ease of rail or deck storage, and its ability to be used as a drag anchor. The Hans-C can also sheath one of its pointed bills in the shank to protect the hull when it is retrieved.

Claesson offers anchors for 14' to 94 boats and will design and manufacture spe- cial models for any class of vessel. Produc- tion weights range from 3.3 lbs. to 110 lbs.

Performance claims are based on its use with a minimum scope of 5:1 and a chain length the same as the boat length, or a minimum chain weight equivalent to that of the anchor. Present models range from $39.95 for the smallest to $740 for the largest. All stock models are made of hot-dipped galvanized steel.

The anchors carry a 90-day, full-refund policy and a limited 3-year repair and replacement policy. For more information, contact Hans-C Anchor Inc., P.O. Box 66756. St. Petersburg, FL 33736, tel. (813* 867-4645 or (800) 728-4645

When the Hans-C Anchor's lower fluke plow is embedded in the bottom, the angle of attack is 28° to 35°. With the anchor completely buried, the angle is between 23° and 30°, and the probability of breaking out of the sea bed is minimal, according to the manufacturer.